New online video training for care home staff

New training video supports care home staff to detect deterioration

Wessex and the West of England Academic Health Science Networks (AHSNs), funded by Health Education England, have collaborated to produce a series of free videos and e-learning materials to support staff working in care homes to care for residents who are at risk of deterioration.

As recognised in a recent paper supported by North East and North Cumbria AHSN, identifying acute illness including sepsis amongst older adults in care homes can be difficult and opportunities to initiate appropriate care may be missed, if illness is not recognised promptly.

The short videos describe how to take measurements from residents correctly (such as blood pressure and oxygen saturation), spot the signs of deterioration, and prevent the spread of infection.

You can also access the films as part of the full training on Health Education England’s e-Learning for Healthcare (e-LfH) Hub (www.e-lfh.org.uk), an educational web-based platform that provides quality assured online training content for the UK’s health and care workforce, from this link.

Natasha Swinscoe, national lead for patient safety for the AHSN Network said:

‘Patient safety is a guiding principle for all AHSNs. Our care homes report highlighted numerous successes that AHSNs have had working with care homes across the country. Collectively, these have the potential to save many lives and tens of millions of pounds.’

Guidance for care home staff to register for an account

To register for e-Learning for Healthcare, visit https://portal.e-lfh.org.uk/Register.

Select the ‘Register’ button. Select the option ‘I am a care home or hospice worker’ then enter your care home / hospice name or postcode and select it from the options available in the drop-down list. Finally enter your care home / hospice registration code and select ‘Register’. You may need to see your employer to get this code.

If your employer does not have a code, then they need to contact the e-LfH Support Team. The Support Team can either give the employer the registration code or arrange a bulk upload of all staff here.

Detailed instructions on how to gain access are available here and a quick start guide to the e-LfH hub available here.

The first cohort of LGBTQ+ Project Dare graduate!

The first cohort of LGBTQ+ Project Dare graduate!

Last week, Project Dare celebrated the graduation of their first LGBTQ+ cohort with a showcase event that saw students performing excerpts of the work they have created on the subject of positive body image.

LGBTQ+ Project Dare, funded by the Health Innovation Network, is a 12-week practical, creative and educational course that encourages individuals to participate in dares as a way of approaching wellbeing, encouraging confidence. It gets students to step out of their comfort zones in a safe space amongst their peers whilst also providing support for those within the LGBTQ+ community, for whom resources are often limited.

Ursula Joy, Lead Facilitator said: “LGBTQIA+ Dare Sessions allow participants a judgement free safe space in which to express themselves creatively, and address head on the issues that affect LGBTQIA+ bodies.”

“Within the gay community, there can be immense pressure to look certain ways. The need to conform in a society dominated by social media and marketing where binary bodies are under the spotlight and non-conformity is monetised.”

“LGBTQIA+ Dares not only gives participants a voice but challenges them to step out of their comfort zones, make positive and accepting connections to who they are, forge meaningful relationships and make changes in their lives.”

“Drama is the perfect vehicle for personal growth and the final showcase provides a sense of ownership, empowerment, and achievement.”

Josh Brewster, Project Manager, Health Innovation Network said:“The Innovation Grants are crucial for projects like “Project Dare” that would be unlikely to receive support from the usual commissioning sources. The grants are a fantastic opportunity to fund projects that can make a huge different to people and do so in ways that are very unique. They act as a great springboard for success allowing the projects to prove their value and hopefully get adopted elsewhere.”

Project Dare ran this course in collaboration with the Recovery College and all of the participants were recruited from the College’s database of service users. The Recovery College offers recovery and wellbeing courses with co-production at the heart of everything they do.

Preventing prescribing errors in south London with PINCER

Over the past fortnight, almost 90 GP pharmacists have taken part in training on software that aims to reduce prescribing errors. PINCER searches GP clinical systems using computerised prescribing safety indicators to identify patients at risk from complications that arise owing to being prescribed multiple medicines that don’t always work together and then acting to correct the problem. The training sessions mean that GP Pharmacists in eight south London CCGs can now use the software in their practises.

“I can’t wait to use the PINCER too, to help reduce errors and adverse reactions. This will help complement our role as clinical pharmacists.”Reena Rabheru-Dodhy, Senior Primary Care Pharmacist

Prescribing errors in general practice are an expensive, preventable cause of safety incidents, illness, hospitalisations and even deaths. Serious errors affect one in 550 prescription items, while hazardous prescribing in general practice contributes to around 1 in 25 hospital admissions.

Outcomes of a trial published in the Lancet showed a reduction in error rates of up to 50% following adoption of PINCER – a pharmacist led system which acts as a risk assessment tool to identify and flag errors in general practice prescribing.

These original PINCER indicators have been incorporated into National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) Medicines Optimisation Clinical Guideline (May 2015).

Mandeep Butt, Communities of Practice, who is part of the Health Innovation Network team coordinating the training was delighted by the response from the trainees:

“I look forward to working with the amazing practice based pharmacists and technicians we have met over the last 2 weeks. Their enthusiasm was infectious!” The trainees

More about PINCER:

Developed by The University of Nottingham, the PINCER intervention developed as part of PRIMIS audit tools is led by primary care pharmacists and pharmacy technicians.

With funding and support from the Health Foundation and East Midlands AHSN, PINCER was rolled out to more than 360 practices across the East Midlands between September 2015 and April 2017.

This involved:

  • Using software to search clinical systems to identify patients at risk of hazardous prescribing
  • Conducting clinical reviews of patient notes and medication
  • Carrying out root cause analysis and providing feedback to the practice
  • Establishing action planning to improve systems and reduce risk
  • Establish action planning to improve systems and reduce risk
    Scale up PINCER using a large-scale Quality Improvement Collaborative approach
  • More than 2.9 million patient records were searched, and 21,617 cases of potentially hazardous prescribing were identified

The programme is one of the interventions selected for national adoption and spread across the AHSN Network and has so far demonstrated great results in a preliminary study, where there was a significant reduction in hazardous prescribing for indicators associated with gastrointestinal bleeding, heart failure and kidney injury.

Further information

Further training sessions will be happening in May and June. For more information or sign up for the training, please contact us.

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If you have any questions or would like more information about PINCER. Please contact us.

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