Welcome to the review of our year in 2020/21

Introduction

Dr Rishi Das-Gupta
Chief Executive

It is difficult to describe the 12 months from April 2020. Certainly when the HIN was planning for 2020/21 it could not have imagined everything that would occur as a result of Covid-19. Although I joined in March 2021 it was clear that our response to the pandemic had been swift and valuable for our members and for that I want to thank Zoe Lelliott in her role as acting Chief Executive.

Professor Richard Barker OBE
Chair, Health Innovation Network

It is difficult to summarise the last year, particularly when we are yet to understand the full ramifications. What is clear though is that while we have now seen off the immediate threat posed by Covid, we will be living with the after-effects of the pandemic for some years.

 

Digitally enabled remote working

The pandemic severely restricted face to face caring and support. Here we demonstrate how our projects supported remote working, including remote consultations for those needing mental health support and the monitoring oxygen levels of patients with Covid in their own homes, or on virtual wards.

 

Long-term conditions and self-management

These programmes and projects looked at how to maintain safe and effective care, initially in the context of a very different model of healthcare being delivered due to the pandemic, but also demonstrate the possibilities of how to deliver care post-pandemic.

 

Evidence generation and evaluation

We want to understand the impact of rapid service changes and build an evidence base for digital tools that can help commissioners, clinicians and partners take key learnings from the pandemic and enable them to make informed choices going forward. Here we have some examples of this important work.

 

Finance and People

Our work looks at how innovation can improve the lives of patients and staff within the NHS. As an employer we want to make sure we carry that through to our own colleagues at the HIN. This section gives the details on the amount of people at the HIN and examples of the work we do to support them.

Finance tables

  • Expenditure
  • £’000
  •  
  • Pay
    Non-Pay
    Total
  • Stroke Prevention
  • 97
    9
    106
  • Diabetes
  • 330
    170
    500
  • Patient Safety & Experience
  • 665
    177
    782
  • Healthy Ageing
  • 330
    101
    431
  • Mental Health
  • 233
    94
    327
  • MSK
  • 483
    62
    544
  • Innovation
  • 318
    62
    380
  • Diabetes
  • 407
    136
    544
  • Graduates into Health
  • 407
    136
    544
  • Technology
  • 331
    6
    337
  • Informatics
  • 211
    0
    211
  • Digital Health.London Accelerator
  • 731
    179
    910
  • Evaluation
  • 127
    -
    127
  • Techforce
  • -
    507
    507
  • Central Costs
  • 801
    938
    1,739
  • Corporate Support
  • 422
    -
    422
  • Communications
  • 407
    136
    544
  • Total
  • 5,716
    2,542
    8,258
  • Income
  • £’000
  • Core Income
  • 4,411
  • Membership
  • 444
  • Other NHS
  • 1,038
  • Universities
  • 33
  • Third Sector
  • 254
  • Escape Pain
  • 107
  • Graduates into Health
  • 502
  • ERDF
  • 579
  • Industry
  • 78
  • Techforce
  • 519
  • Total
  • 7,965

Pay gap

Mean: Men 20% higher than women (last year the mean hourly rate for hourly rate for women was 4.9 per cent more than men).
Median: Men 31% higher than women (last year the median hourly rate for women was 2.6 per cent higher).

Mean: Those who identify as white 2% higher than those who identify as being from an ethnic minority (this is the first time we have reported this figure).
Median: Those who identify as white 14% higher than those who do identify as being from an ethnic minority (this is the first time we have reported this figure).

It is worth noting that this is driven by salaries across a range of staff roles and working patterns.

 

Breakdown of Diversity by band